Embroidery and its Artistic Element

Everyone has a different and broad way of seeing and using embroidery whether it is made by hand or by machines like those found in https://embroideryportal.net/. Several individuals consider embroidery as a craft, instead of an ‘art’. Therefore, embroidery is not every so often talked about in conjunction with recognized forms of ‘high art’, for example, painting or sculpture. Nonetheless, the scale of ingenuity, the color combination used, delicate variations in design, emotional response to a specific setting or condition, all qualities ascribed to ‘art’, can be seen in embroidery.

An embroidery is a form of art that utilizes a needle specifically used for embroidery, thread, and patterns, instead of a paintbrush, paint, or a pencil. Embroidery is every so often included in historic paintings, however, it is mirrored as an element rather than the theme or topic itself. Many contemporary artists take in embroidery or embroiderers in their visual arts – particularly those that have a societal or political significance. The work of Fathy Chapin, a Palestinian artist, comprises several fabric and clothing patterns in his paintings. One of his paintings which was called ‘My Country,’ contains spindles that are filled with wool, soft fixtures, possibly from a tent band or a pillow, in addition to a face veil of a woman, and a lady dressed in a Palestinian tailored dress which highlights on the yoke panel, sleeve and skirt bands that are embroidered. The garment does not originate from any specific region. It is generally ‘Palestinian.’

In the 20th and early 21st centuries, increasingly more individuals were getting old portions of embroidery and applied them as an element of interior design, with no evident connection to the original purpose of the piece. In a number of instances, apparels, coats or scarves are merely draped on the wall. Priestly vestments from the medieval era that were embroidered were utilized as upholstery. A woman’s outfit is framed in a similar way that a painting is framed, or a head covering for women from Yemen is cut through and used as a table top runner. As a result of this kind of recycling, these items assume a new character, specifically, they now have the function of ‘Art’ and intrinsically they are conserved.

But then again all too often, still, these embroidered items that we call ‘art’ have an absence of a story, a lack of context or background, and the audiences no longer recognize or appreciate what the item truly was, its real purpose and who were the individuals behind it. Then again are these essentially relevant or important if the artistic nature and technical ability of the embroidery are valued and cherished? By being transformed into ‘art’, such embroideries can take on a second nature in preference to being discarded. Is this wrong? Let’s reflect on these.

Keeping the Ancient Craft of Tin Embroidery Alive