Gender Roles in Visual Arts

Hormones in females are called estrogen while male hormones are called testosterone. Even though these hormones are recognized with a certain gender, they are actually found in both males and females. However, testosterone in men are higher and plays a necessary part in men’s health. It supports the progress, development, and upkeep of muscle mass, bone thickness, and a man’s overall virility. Testosterone deficiency in men often leads to low energy, reduction in muscle mass, irritability, and a drop in sex drive. There are natural remedies and supplements to raise testosterone levels such as TestoGen. Females, on the other hand, have more estrogen. It aids in the normalizing menstrual cycle, sexual development and affects the whole reproductive system. High estrogen level in women may lead to hair loss, exhaustion, weight gain, irregular menstruation or it may be unusually heavier, mood swings, and headaches.

Gender Representations in Visual Art

Aside from the genetic or bodily determination of the sexes, gender is a societal and cultural grouping of femininity and masculinity and the product in gender depictions in visual arts is because of the cultural development of defining sexual and social personality or identity.

Gender is definitely a subject that could be addressed all through the whole study and assessment of art. In the nineteenth century, they had really strong conceptions of gender roles. The men are depicted as having physical strength, brave and gallant while women were seen as delicate, gentle, and sensitive.

For example, it is shown in the neoclassical artworks of Jacques-Louis David. Some of his paintings include the Oath of the Horatii and The Lictors Bringing to Brutus the Bodies of His Sons for Burial. His paintings demonstrated how females collapse or fall over, cry, and grieve while men take control and prepare for combat, or battle and as a leader make tough choices or decision.